27
Oct
14

A Guide to Memory/Object Pooling

I was recently listening to a vlog by a games developer who wanted a new programming language specifically for games, and one of his big gripes with C++ was the memory allocation process. He had a number of arguments, none of which resonated with me, but it did spark interest for me in the memory allocation/de-allocation problem. I’ll briefly discuss the problem from the perspective of a language like C (in this case Pascal) and one that uses garbage collection (in this case Java).

Most languages dynamically allocate and free memory in very much the same way as even very old languages such as Pascal did. You have to explicitly ask the API to allocate memory for you, and then explicitly free it when you are finished with it. In an OO language like C++ this results in the need for destructors to free the memory the object uses when it is destroyed.

Either way memory is allocated and freed, and if it is done on a regular basis this can lead to something called heap fragmentation. Heap fragmentation is not quite the same as disk fragmentation in that an allocated block will not be split up. Pascal for instance allocates memory one block after another, simply creating the new one at the end of the old one. However when a block of memory is freed it leaves a hole, these holes are effectively heap fragmentation.

Pascal deals with these holes by maintaining a free list, which is a linked list containing all the free blocks available. When an application allocates more memory the list is traversed to find the first available memory big enough for the new allocation, hopefully filling the hole but possibly leaving a small amount still available. Clearly the holes will likely get smaller over time until they are unusable, and the more holes there are the longer any memory allocation will take.

Other allocation schemes are available in other languages, but they have similar issues, take a look here to see what I mean. Whatever scheme you use there is significant cost the more you allocate and free memory.

Garbage collected languages such as Java have problems of their own. Whilst it is claimed that allocating memory in Java is practically free in terms of complexity, freeing memory is known to have performance issues as the garbage collector (GC for short) kicks in to clean up. The mechanics of the memory allocation mechanism are largely hidden in a language like Java, so that shouldn’t concern you much, but the performance impact a garbage collector can have should concern you.

So why is the GC a potential performance hazard? In order for the GC to know which memory to free it must work out which memory is still being used. One way of doing that is maintaining a reference count for each pointer/reference in use. Obviously any reference with a count of zero can be freed, but this leads to another problem, determining which collections of objects can be freed.

Imagine a data structure like a tree in which every node holds a reference not only to its children but its parent as well. If you were to use the tree, holding only a reference to the root node, then later released that reference, reference counting would not enable freeing the memory the tree uses. Even though no external objects can reach it. A GC therefore also needs to have an algorithm that will check the reachability of memory.

That’s a rather simplistic view of garbage collection, but it’s enough to see that running the GC can be expensive.

So how can you deal with these issues? It seems it doesn’t matter which kind of system/language you use, memory management has real implications for performance. One answer is to use a technique commonly called object or memory pooling.

A simple way to think of a memory pool is that it’s a lot like a cupboard. When you need something it’s quite quick to go to the cupboard and get something that’s available there, and when you’re done with it you return it. If the cupboard turned out to be empty, you’d have to go down to the shops in order to buy more of whatever you need. An advantage being you can stock your cupboard with resources you plan on using later.

Memory and object pools are effectively exactly the same thing. You can preallocate memory, use it, return it to the pool, then use it again. This reduces the amount of stress on the memory allocation system, leading to fewer GCs and less heap fragmentation. You’d be amazed how much difference something like this can make on a system, especially something like Android.

As an example, I implemented a path finding algorithm in Java for a maze game I am writing. I could have used a dynamically sized data stack that grows and shrinks as the algorithm functions. That would however trigger the GC much more frequently as is uses and releases memory on the data stack. It is much better to preallocate the maximum size of the stack once, and reuse the same memory every time the algorithm is used. This only allows one instance of the algorithm to run at once, but it can be adjusted to allow multi-threading by creating a shared pool that each instance can use.

So what kinds of objects or memory should you use pooling for? Ideally anything that is short-lived should have some kind of pooling scheme in place as they put the most stress on the memory allocation system. This would be objects like particles and bullets in a game engine. Long-lived and infrequently used objects that pose less of a problem to the system don’t really need to be pooled as they cause much less stress.

Pooling can also be used for other resources that are expensive to create and destroy such as database or network connections. This can help alleviate stress on other systems such as the network stack, database servers, and file systems. So they are really an import tool in any programmers toolbox to improve performance.

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