28
Aug
15

Creating a Benchmark: part 5 – a road-block in testing

Some months ago I set about working on creating a bench mark program to compare the Borland Graphics Interface (BGI for short) with a hand coded in assembly VGA library. I had completed work on the library and even tested it on my Pentium 200Mhz MMX. So I decided to do the final tests to get the results when I ran into a road-block that still has me stumped.

I had three different setups to test the code on. Dosbox (at a fixed cycle count), my Pentium 200Mhz MMX machine running MS-DOS 6.22 and this machine (the last in the post), a 386sx running at 20Mhz. The BGI code runs fine on all three machines, but the hand coded library fails on the 386sx locking up during the first test – blitting sprites.

This was quite confusing as the test appears to at least partially work as a number of sprites are drawn to the screen quite quickly, but sometime during the test it always freezes. I thought about what could cause this and decided to try disabling interrupts during the drawing process. I did this as the main instruction used for copying bytes to video RAM does have an interrupt bug on older processors (286). This unfortunately had no effect. See this previous post to see code I used for copying memory.

Whilst disabling interrupts didn’t fix the problem, it did confirm which instruction was causing the problem. The rep movsw instruction was the only one I put between disabling and enabling interrupts (using cli and sti). When the machine froze with this change it no longer responded to keyboard interrupts that it did before. This indicates a crash during either an interrupt itself (unlikely) or this repeating instruction.

Given this strange problem I decided to test the machine by running memory tests and another graphical benchmark to see if there could be a hardware issue. It seems that the memory is ok, and it ran a 3d VGA benchmark with no trouble over night. I’ve also played some games such as Hocus Pocus that have parallax scrolling and would put a bit of load on the relevant parts with no problems.

So the question arises, am I putting too much data/strain into the Trident graphics chip for it to cope? I’m unsure if i can answer this. The process of copying the memory has several overheads. The processor has to read the word, write the word, increment the memory indexes and then decide whether to stop copying for each iteration of the instruction. This would at best be one word copied per 2 bus clock cycles, but is likely to be quite a bit slower, from memory I think like 6 clocks per memory copy for a 386.

I think it unlikely that I’m over taxing the graphic chip, but this problem does highlight one of the major problems people had when creating their own graphics libraries. Small shareware developers couldn’t have tested enough hardware to ensure that what they wrote would work on a large array of systems. The BGI however, having more resources behind it, has a quite good compatibility record.

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